Bad Breeders

Parenting so bad, it's criminal

Toddler cheats death

Toddler cheats death The Republican-American.

Hanlon said Vargas told him her daughter had opened the window before. He said the windows have screens, but they were not in. The girl’s father, Carlos Vazquez, 21, said he took them out for the winter, but forgot to put them back in.

Huh?

Thanks to Cassandra for the tip.

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Updated: September 14, 2009 — 10:28 pm

16 Comments

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  1. WTH?

  2. WTH?

  3. Why the hell didn’t they have window guards?? I know many states will provide them for free or at reduced cost for low-income families, so in most cases cost should not be a deterrent to child-proofing windows. Screens will not withstand the weight of a toddler, and should never, ever be relied on to keep a child from falling out a window!

    I also know that most pediatricians will repeatedly ask parents if they’ve baby-proofed their home, so I just don’t think there’s an excuse for not doing it. They can’t possibly have not known that their home would need to be baby-proofed.

  4. Why the hell didn’t they have window guards?? I know many states will provide them for free or at reduced cost for low-income families, so in most cases cost should not be a deterrent to child-proofing windows. Screens will not withstand the weight of a toddler, and should never, ever be relied on to keep a child from falling out a window!

    I also know that most pediatricians will repeatedly ask parents if they’ve baby-proofed their home, so I just don’t think there’s an excuse for not doing it. They can’t possibly have not known that their home would need to be baby-proofed.

  5. I’m from New Zealand and we have more than our fair share of PBBs/Bad Breeders. I only wish our courts in NZ handed down the kind of sentences the American courts do. I have started a similar blog to yours Trench, focusing on child abuse in New Zealand. Please take a look: http://hoogenboom.ath.cx/spleenz/?cat=3

  6. I’m from New Zealand and we have more than our fair share of PBBs/Bad Breeders. I only wish our courts in NZ handed down the kind of sentences the American courts do. I have started a similar blog to yours Trench, focusing on child abuse in New Zealand. Please take a look: http://hoogenboom.ath.cx/spleenz/?cat=3

  7. What is the purpose of taking screens out for the winter? I’ve never heard of such a thing. Another case of parental stupidity. AND nobody got in trouble for this ‘accident’, so there is probably not much hope that the parents will be any more responsible in the future. I’ll be shocked if this baby lives past her 5th birthday. 🙄

  8. What is the purpose of taking screens out for the winter? I’ve never heard of such a thing. Another case of parental stupidity. AND nobody got in trouble for this ‘accident’, so there is probably not much hope that the parents will be any more responsible in the future. I’ll be shocked if this baby lives past her 5th birthday. 🙄

  9. Angel, a lot of people do take screens out after it gets too cold to have the windows open. Some people don’t like them so even though it’s odd, people do take them out. 😉 Anyway, this is ridiculous, one poster on the actual article says it wasn’t really their fault and God saved her. Well I’ll buy that God saved her but the parents should take that as a strong lesson, because she may not be “saved” next time. It really amazes me that if a parent knows their child can open a window, then why would you allow such a dangerous situation to exsist? I still am amazed that a 3 year old could open a window, climb out, etc. Was there something under it that allowed her to get up there or was the window low to the ground? People are morons, accidents do happen but this was totally preventable.

  10. Angel, a lot of people do take screens out after it gets too cold to have the windows open. Some people don’t like them so even though it’s odd, people do take them out. 😉 Anyway, this is ridiculous, one poster on the actual article says it wasn’t really their fault and God saved her. Well I’ll buy that God saved her but the parents should take that as a strong lesson, because she may not be “saved” next time. It really amazes me that if a parent knows their child can open a window, then why would you allow such a dangerous situation to exsist? I still am amazed that a 3 year old could open a window, climb out, etc. Was there something under it that allowed her to get up there or was the window low to the ground? People are morons, accidents do happen but this was totally preventable.

  11. Some people remove screens because they do block the natural sunlight (to an extent), which can make a noticeable difference in the natural heat coming into that room in the winter… it also makes the windows easier to clean come spring.

    However, screens should never, ever be considered a safe barrier to keep children from falling out. Any windows not on the 1st floor should have safety guards installed. It’s probably not a bad idea to install them in the child’s bedroom even if it’s on the 1st floor (especially if you leave the windows open at night… just sayin’.)

    Also, the window doesn’t have to be within reach. My 2 year old son decided (quite out of the blue and on his own) the other night to push a chair over to the gate barrier I had up to keep him sequestered in the living room while dinner was being cooked, so he could climb onto the chair and over the gate. Children can surprise you, which is why parents need to research child proofing basics and implement them before and incident occurs.

    It’s routine for nurses, midwives, and doctors to bring up the subject when a woman is pregnant with her first child, and for a baby’s pediatrician to bring it up repeatedly. So I can’t imagine that these parents didn’t know that a) screens are not enough, and b) they needed to take additional steps to keep their baby safe. I can see a toddler being able to open a window if it’s not locked (some have lock tabs that allow the window to only open a few inches, and some people will use a nail or screw in older wooden windows.) If you can’t afford window guards, and they’re not provided free or at reduced cost in your area, don’t leave your windows unlocked.

    Also, window A/C’s are not safe to have with toddlers, unless they’re very securely installed… not just set into the window, with the window closed on it to hold it in place as I’ve seen people do. A determined child could push that out and fall out after it, risking not only injury/death to the child, but to any pedestrians who may be passing below.

  12. Some people remove screens because they do block the natural sunlight (to an extent), which can make a noticeable difference in the natural heat coming into that room in the winter… it also makes the windows easier to clean come spring.

    However, screens should never, ever be considered a safe barrier to keep children from falling out. Any windows not on the 1st floor should have safety guards installed. It’s probably not a bad idea to install them in the child’s bedroom even if it’s on the 1st floor (especially if you leave the windows open at night… just sayin’.)

    Also, the window doesn’t have to be within reach. My 2 year old son decided (quite out of the blue and on his own) the other night to push a chair over to the gate barrier I had up to keep him sequestered in the living room while dinner was being cooked, so he could climb onto the chair and over the gate. Children can surprise you, which is why parents need to research child proofing basics and implement them before and incident occurs.

    It’s routine for nurses, midwives, and doctors to bring up the subject when a woman is pregnant with her first child, and for a baby’s pediatrician to bring it up repeatedly. So I can’t imagine that these parents didn’t know that a) screens are not enough, and b) they needed to take additional steps to keep their baby safe. I can see a toddler being able to open a window if it’s not locked (some have lock tabs that allow the window to only open a few inches, and some people will use a nail or screw in older wooden windows.) If you can’t afford window guards, and they’re not provided free or at reduced cost in your area, don’t leave your windows unlocked.

    Also, window A/C’s are not safe to have with toddlers, unless they’re very securely installed… not just set into the window, with the window closed on it to hold it in place as I’ve seen people do. A determined child could push that out and fall out after it, risking not only injury/death to the child, but to any pedestrians who may be passing below.

  13. Am I the only suspicious minded person who wants to point out that no one actually SAW the baby fall? Isn’t it possible the baby didn’t “fall” on her own? I mean, parents who claim their child can open a window – and has done it before – yet leave the screens out and the windows unlocked on the third floor? Seems too convenient to be coincidence to me.

  14. Am I the only suspicious minded person who wants to point out that no one actually SAW the baby fall? Isn’t it possible the baby didn’t “fall” on her own? I mean, parents who claim their child can open a window – and has done it before – yet leave the screens out and the windows unlocked on the third floor? Seems too convenient to be coincidence to me.

  15. I think this was an accident. I’m grateful that the child was not injured. I agree that screens are NOT a protective barrier. My 6 y/o pushed the screen out of the basement window (ground level). One of our teen foster kids would push the screen out of his bedroom window and climb out and drop to the chair he positioned below (thinking that I’m too stupid to notice a big brown chair under the window against a white house). I guess the screens come out much easier than you’d think.

    You also run a risk that older children can disable a safety barrier to open a window (my 7 y/o foster son did this at my sister’s house in her 2 y/o’s room). Luckily we caught it before the 2 y/o (who climbs EVERYTHING) did.

    I think this family has learned a valuable lesson.

  16. I think this was an accident. I’m grateful that the child was not injured. I agree that screens are NOT a protective barrier. My 6 y/o pushed the screen out of the basement window (ground level). One of our teen foster kids would push the screen out of his bedroom window and climb out and drop to the chair he positioned below (thinking that I’m too stupid to notice a big brown chair under the window against a white house). I guess the screens come out much easier than you’d think.

    You also run a risk that older children can disable a safety barrier to open a window (my 7 y/o foster son did this at my sister’s house in her 2 y/o’s room). Luckily we caught it before the 2 y/o (who climbs EVERYTHING) did.

    I think this family has learned a valuable lesson.

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